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New Music from Ray Lamontagne

Ladies and Gentleman,

I would like to extend to you this humble invitation: to be among a select few of my listening audience to hear a passage from my latest composition titled ‘Ouroboros’.
‘Ouroboros’ is an album musically unlike any I have recorded previously. It did not make itself known to me in sections, sessions, or moments carved out of the clutter of every day life. It presented itself as the simple question: “Will you follow me?”
Of course I couldn’t say no. I had to follow. What else could I do?
I had nothing with which to record the journey that was taken. The album is merely an attempt to recreate, from memory, the landscapes, the colors, the sights and sounds that were experienced. I only thank God for the vividness of those experiences, and for the ease of their recollection.
I realize that in my invitation for you to listen, I am in fact asking something of you as well; for listening is not a purely passive act. Listening takes effort. To listen is to participate.
There can be no conversation without one who is first willing to listen.
And so I both invite you to, and ask if you might, sit, quiet your surroundings, quiet your mind, and listen as I present to you the question that was first presented to me: Will you follow me?

Yrs,
Ray LaMontagne

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Grant Gerathy- Drums John Butler Trio – Byron Bay, Australia

While filming on location at The Calgary Folk Music Festival this past July, I noticed a familiar face in the hotel hallway. Beach waves, flip flops, and a laid back smile. What a pleasant surprise!

Where are you writing this?

On an old lounge in the sun

Home is where your story begins, would you tell us a bit about yours?

Byron is one of the friendliest places I know. It’s such a great place to be.

How did music find you?

I was surrounded by it from an early age, it was only a matter of time. Everyone in my family play some instrument.

What was it about the drums?

My uncle was an amazing drummer. I think I knew how to play a beat before even sitting on a kit. I actually had a kit for 6 years before sitting down and really playing it, then didn’t put the sticks down.

As a drummer where does your inspiration/ new beats come from?

So many influences, but you can’t go past older stuff like Al Jackson Jnr’s playing on all the Stax recordings. You will hear just about every beat that your hear on the radio these days in that old stuff. John Frusciante does some great drum programming, and of course the legendary programming of JDilla

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Photography by Allison Seto

How were you discovered to be involved in the John Butler Trio? 

I have known Byron for years and had met John several times. John asked if I would like to have a play with them, and something worked I guess.

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“Youth” A film by Paolo Sorrentino is a must see.

Clever and intuitive artistry. A compelling journey accompanied by a introspective soundtrack. A must see film within today’s releases.

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Escondido prepare for February Release: Walking With A Stranger

Up and coming music blog New Interstice recently released an article and video on Escondido that is too good not to share.

Escondido is Nashville, TN based artists Jessica Maros and Tyler James.  Recorded live in a single day, their debut album, The Ghost of Escondido, was self-released in 2013 to critical acclaim.  Their David Lynch approved desert rock was described by Vogue as “One of the rare alt-country crossover acts with highbrow cred” and led to appearances on Conan and ABC’s “Nashville.”  Following the release, the band toured North America and Europe with the likes of Lord Huron and Wild Cub while spending their down time composing music for TV & Film.  Most recently, they wrote a song with Lena Dunham for characters Marnie & Desi in the upcoming season of HBO’s “Girls.”  The duo recently completed their follow-up album, Walking With A Stranger.

The pair met while James was recording their mutual friend at his home studio.  “Jess was quietly strumming this song Rodeo Queen on the couch while everyone else was making drinks in the kitchen.  I pushed record and added a little groove before folks got back in the room.  Later that night we listened to it and both said ‘You wanna make a record?’”  They spent the next two months crafting the songs and bonding over a shared love of spaghetti westerns and songwriters from the 70’s.  “We’d put on Ennio Morricone every morning,” says Maros.  “It’s an easy process when you both love the same stuff.”

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