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Take A Knee

TAKE A KNEE

“Take a little trip to Valley Forge in January. If you don’t know where that is, just Google it from the sidelines. Hold a musket ball in your fingers and imagine it piercing your flesh and breaking a bone or two. There won’t be a doctor or trainer to assist you until after the battle, so just wait your turn. Take your cleats and socks off to get a real experience. Then take a knee.

Then, take one at the beach in Normandy where man after American man stormed the beach, even as the one in front of him was shot to pieces…the very sea stained with American blood. The only blockers most had were the dead bodies in front of them, riddled with bullets from enemy fire.

Take a knee in the sweat soaked jungles of Vietnam. from Khe San to Saigon… Anywhere will do. REAL Americans died in all those jungles. There was no playbook that told them what was next, but they knew what flag they represented. When they came home, they were protested as well..and spit on for reasons only cowards know.

Take another knee in the blood drenched sands of Fallujah in 110 degree heat… Wear your Kevlar helmet and battle dress… Your number won’t be printed on it unless your number is up! You’ll need to stay hydrated but there won’t be anyone to squirt Gatorade into your mouth. You’re on your own.

There’s a lot of places to take a knee. Real Americans have given their lives all over the world. When you use the banner under which they fought as a source for your displeasure, you dishonor the memories of those who bled for the very freedoms you have. That’s what the red stripes mean. It represents the blood of those who spilled a sea of it defending your liberty.

While you’re on your knee, pray for those that came before you, not on a manicured lawn striped and printed with numbers to announce every inch of ground taken…but on nameless hills and bloodied beaches and sweltering forests and bitter cold mountains…every inch marked by an American life lost serving that flag you protest.

No cheerleaders, no announcers, no coaches, no fans…just American men and women…delivering the real fight against those who chose to harm us…blazing a path so you would have ‘the right to take a knee.’

You haven’t an inkling what it took to get you where you are; but your ‘protest’ is duly noted. Not only is it disgraceful to a nation of real heroes, it serves the purpose of pointing to your ingratitude for those who chose to defend you under that banner that will still wave long after your jersey is issued to another…

If you really feel the need to take a knee, come with me to church on Sunday and we’ll both kneel before Almighty God. We’ll thank Him for preserving this country for as long as He has. We’ll beg forgiveness for our ingratitude for all He has provided us. We’ll appeal to Him for understanding and wisdom. We’ll pray for liberty and justice for all…because He is the one who provides those things.

And there will be no protest. There will only be gratitude for His provision and a plea for His continued grace and mercy on the land of the free and the home of the brave It goes like this…”

GOD BLESS AMERICA!

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Craig Roh – More Than A Football Player

When you hear the name Craig ‘Death’ Roh different visions come to mind. I had the privilege to catch up with this man who is more than a triple threat on the field – he is a player of integrity, faith and belief that all things are possible when you take the high road.

Have a listen and learn more about #93 and this man behind the football player – Craig Roh.

“Well, Roh is my last name, and I realized one day that ‘Death Roh’ would be a cool nickame, I realized this in senior year of high school. I had an interview right after that for a Michigan website and I told them that my nickname was ‘Death Roh’, and it stuck ever since. I’m definitely not a ‘death row’ type personality, but the nickname is cool. You gotta have a different persona on the field – you can’t always be who you are in civilian life. On the field, you gotta be violent, you gotta be aggressive. Off the field, you have to be loving, charismatic, and gentle.
My journey with the Lions is awesome. It’s truly a blessing,I came out here just wanting to keep playing football. Vancouver has been an awesome city,the BC Lions organization has been so fun to get to know, my teammates are awesome, the D-line is awesome, and I’m really happy up here.”

 

Stay up to date on all things Craig Roh

Twitter – @_DeathRoh

Instagram – craigroh93

BC LIONS

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Five Important Lessons

Five Lessons About the Way We Treat People

First Important Lesson – Cleaning Lady

During my second month of college, our professor gave us a pop quiz. I was a conscientious student and had breezed through the questions until I read the last one:
“What is the name of the woman who cleans the school?” – Surely this was some kind of joke. I had seen the cleaning woman several times. She was tall, dark – haired and in her 50’s, but how would I know her name?
I handed in my paper, leaving the last question blank. Just before class ended, one student asked if the last question would count toward our quiz grade. “Absolutley,” said the professor… “In your careers, you will meet many people. All are significant… They deserve your attention and care, even if all you do is smile and say “hello…” I’ve never forgotten that lesson… I also learned her name was Dorothy.

Second Important Lesson – Pickup in the Rain

ONe night, at 11)30 p.m. and older African American woman was standing on the side of an Alabama highway trying to endure a lashing rain storm. Her car had broken down and she desperately needed a ride. Soaking wet, she decided to flag down the next car. A young white man stopped to help her, generally unheard of in those conflict -filled 1960’s. The man took her to safety, helped her get assistance and put her into a taxicab. She seemed to be in a big hurry, but wrote down his address and thanked him. Seven days went by and a knock came on the man’s door. To his surprise, a giant console colour TV was delivered to his home. A special note was attached. It read:
“Thank you so much for assisting me on the highway the other night. The rain drenched not only my clothes, but also my spirits. Then you came along. Because of you, I was able to make it to my dying husband’s bedside just before he passed away…God bless you for helping me and unselfishly serving others.”
Sincerely, Mrs. Nat King Cole

Third Important Lesson – Always Remember Those Who Serve

IN the days when an ice cream sundae cost much less, a 10 year old boy entered a hotel coffee shop and sat at a table, A waitress put a glass of water in front of him. “How much is an ice cream sundae?” he asked. “Fifty cents,” replied the waitress. The little boy pulled his hand out of his pocket and studied the coins in it. “Well, how much is a plain dis of ice cream?” he inquired. By now more people were waiting for a table and the waitress was growing impatient… “Thirty-five cents,” she brusquely replied. The little boy again, counted his coins. “I’ll have the plain ice cream,” he said. The waitress brought the ice cream, put the bill on the table and walked away. The boy finished the ice cream, paid the cashier and left… When the waitress came back, she began to cry as she wiped down the table . There, placed neatly beside the empty dish, were tow nickels and five pennies… You see, he couldn’t have the sundae, because he had to have enough to leave her a tip.

Fourth Important Lesson – The Obstacle in Our Path

IN ancient times, a King had a boulder placed on a roadway. Then he hid himself and watched to see if anyone would remove the huge rock. Some of the King’s wealthiest merchants and courtiers came by and simply walked around it… Many loudly blamed the King for not keeping the roads clear, but none did anything about getting the stone out of the way. Then a peasant came along carrying a load of vegetables. Upon apporaching the boulder, the peasant laid down his burden and tried to move the stone to the side of the road. After much pushing and straining, he finally succeeded. AFter the peasant picked up his load of vegetables, he noticed a purse lying in the road where the boulder had been The purse contained many gold coins and a note for the King indicating that the gold was for the person who removed the boulder from the roadway. The peasant learned what many of us never understand!
Every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve our condition.

Fifth IMportant Lesson – Giving When It Counts

Many years ago, when I worked as a volunteer at a hospital, I got to know a little girl named Liz who was suffering from a rare & serious disease. Her only chance of recovery appeared to be a blood transfusion from her 5 year old brother, who had miraculously survived the same disease and had developed the antibodies needed to combat the illness. The doctor explained the situation to her little brother, and asked the little boy if he would be willing to give his blood to his sister. I saw him hesitate for only a moment before taking a deep breath and saying, “Yes I’ll do it if it will save her.” As the transfusion progressed, he lay in bed next to his sister and smiled, as we all did, seeing the colour returning to her cheek. Then his face grew pale and his smile faded. He looked up at the doctor and asked with a trembling voice, “Will I start to die right away?” Being young the little boy had misunderstood the Doctor; he thought he was going to have to give his sister all of his blood in order to save her.

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