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Tyler Lyle

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Time can make thoughts slip through the cracks, but the memory to your favourite soundtrack will never be forgotten. 

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Jesse Kinch- Long Island, NY

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Blowing into Long Island along with the snow we found our way to a place where songs are born and peaceful harmonies abide. Deep inside the Sanctuary of Jesse Kinch we went back in time, yet felt ourselves breathing in the essence of something new, that can only come from that eternal place where rock & roll lives forever. 

There is more to this winner of Rising Star ABC than meets the eye and we hope you will take a moment to get to know the man behind the music. Looking forward to his new album he has been fighting so hard for.

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Brooklyn – Makes You Feel Good

Love getting caught up in the cinema and this weekend I took in Brooklyn – twice.

Ellis Lacey departs from her home in Ireland to find a new way in the city of Brooklyn, New York. This screen play written by Nick Hornby captures the sweet innocence of this historical period in time, with Director John Crowley and Cinematographer Yves Bélanger creating an ambience that makes the heart grow nostalgic for moments that may be long forgotten in this new day and age.

Brooklyn presents us with Ellis (Saoirse Ronan) experiencing a dire bout of homesickness, which in this case makes her ache for a place she was aching to leave. After riding the waves of change ‘Irish Ellis’ meets  ‘Italian Tony’ (Emory Cohen) who wins her heart and trust with his loyalty. She finds the feeling of home within him.

This film takes you through the makings of love – the feelings of loss – the rawness of temptation – and the victory of triumph.

Truly touching, this is composed and powerful filmmaking that makes the complications of life seem poetic, beautiful, and integral. Overall Brooklyn just makes you feel happy and believe in the power of love.

 

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Linda Eastman on Photographing The Doors

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I first photographed The Doors at a small New York club, close to the 59th Street Bridge, called Ondine’s, which was a favorite place for out of town bands to come and play residencies.

It was the winter of 1966 and I was down there with some friends to see a Los Angeles band that Elektra Records had recently signed. I had my camera with me and started taking pictures of them as they played.

No one in New York had heard of The Doors. They had never performed outside of Los Angeles and hadn’t released any records. Because they were unknown and the club was so intimate I had the unique opportunity of being able to get up really close as they played.

It wasn’t Jim Morrison’s looks that struck me first about him. It was the poetry of his songs and the way he would get completely lost in the music. He had this habit of cupping his hand behind his ear so the he could hear his vocals the way the traditional folk singers did. I thought the whole band was great; Ray Manzarek, Robby Krieger and John Densmore were all very creative musicans.

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